Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Gauze Embroidery

Gauze.


Silk gauze.



That's what this beautiful embroidery on the front of this purse is stitched upon.

I've been enthralled with gauze embroidery for some time and was thrilled to come across this article in a 1930's edition of Weldon's Needle-Art series magazine.


The little purse that I have as an example looks very much like the one displayed in the article which is referred to as Viennese.

The pattern for this purse is included in the publication and was stitched on 40 count gauze over 1 thread with one strand of filoselle silk in the needle.


We are still able to find silk gauze today and I've stitched a few small pieces but nothing as stunning as the examples I'm sharing today.  


There's something incredibly elegant about this petit-point on silk gauze.  I love how the gauze allows the fabric underneath to show through.  

It makes me think of other uses particularly for crazy quilting...or for a purse for something special like a bride...and so I sit here dreaming of designs on silk gauze.

This purse also has a spray of chenille and metal embroidered edging.  Though we can find silk chenille today, our versions are much thicker than what was used on a purse such as this...



Silk gauze work is popular with miniaturists such as doll house hobbyists who make tiny tapestries, rugs, fire screens and pillows all stitched on silk gauze.

I'm dreaming of something a bit bigger than that.

Here's a second example of silk petit-point on silk gauze...


Though this purse has some spotting on the silk gauze, you can still see how the purse's front is made from silk gauze which allows the fabric underneath to show through...


I like the use of transparency and the layering of fabrics to create an overall stunning effect.

Even though the gauze isn't in the best shape, the beauty of the embroidery is in no way diminished...


The last example I have is stitched on silk gauze as well...


But the gauze is completely stitched over to the edges of the purse...


Though this example is still lovely, it's not nearly as captivating to me as the previous two.  

Something about not filling in all the background places the embroidery front and center.


If you're interested in giving silk gauze a try, Mary Corbet has a few articles on the subject here and here.  What would we do without Mary?  

I've found 40 ct silk gauze at Nordic Needle and both 40 ct and 72 ct at Lacis but I'll warn you...it can be a bit expensive.  

Happy dreaming everyone.

16 comments:

anne said...

I think you'll like the work of Reflet de Soie. It is in French, put pictures are there and lovely. It is the same type of design. There is a very little on gauze de soie. This woman is reproducing old embroideries.

anne said...

The classic, I forgot to give you the link
http://www.reflets-de-soie.fr/

Toni said...

Is the gauze embroidery pattern available for the Weldon's Needle-Art piece? I have been looking for a pattern like this. Thanks!

Marlis said...

wondering if you've ever tried the silk gauze at Dharma Trading :
http://www.dharmatrading.com/fabric/silk/gauze.html. Not sure if it is the same. Your work is beautiful. I look so forward to your posts.


Natalia's Fine Needlework said...

Your work is outstanding, I am your big fan. By the way, I sell silk gauze and my prices are not that crazy. Currently I have a silk gauze sale in bargain Corner. Please, visit my website at http://www.dollhouseneedlepoint.com/apps/webstore/products/category/963953?page=1

Rachel said...

Now, what are you planning, I wonder...? Looking forward to hearing more!

The Chilly Hollow Needlepoint Adventure said...

Natalie has silk gauze on sale. It's not large pieces but still....
http://www.dollhouseneedlepoint.com/apps/webstore/products/category/1098667?page=1

Catherine said...

All so beautiful!

Createology said...

Lovely work and very amazing that it has remained in such good condition since it is on such delicate silk gauze. I learn the very best information from you Susan Dear...

margaret said...

these are beautiful, my eyes are not good enough for this technique plus we used to sell the silk gauze at the shows and it is so very very expensive.

Mosaic Magpie said...

The third example, the one you like the least, is the one I like the best. The other 2 look as though someone forgot to stitch in the background. I will go over and read some more on the subject with Mary C., I am wondering if it is only these fine gauge pieces where the background is not worked. I have seen larger gauge maybe a 14, where the background was unworked and assumed it still needed the background stitched.
Deb

Judy S. said...

Very pretty! Are you going to make one?

Mary Ann said...

I love this type of petite point and was quite addicted to it when I was in university. Never mind when that was. LONG ago...LOL. I used to make doll house sized rugs and seat cushions and so on that I sold at a weekly market for extra money. It really should be done on the silk net/gauze. Although having said that I did buy some polyester netting in England in the 80's that suited quite well in lieu of the silk which I found hard to get.

Lisa said...

I just saw silk gauze for sale this past weekend ~ and wondered what it was used for. Then, here you are, answering my question with lovely eye candy!

Suztats said...

Oooh, these are so delicate and beautiful! Now, I wonder just what you're going to make with your silk gauze, Susan. Hmmmmmm

Wendy said...

Susan, ran across this and immediately thought of you. Tracey Lawko does Stumpwork:

http://traceylawko.com/gallery/still-life/

Hope you enjoy! =-)
-Wendy

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