Friday, February 8, 2013

Happy Harikuyo!

Is "Happy" Harikuyo appropriate?

After all, in Japanese hari means "needle" and kuyo means "memorial service".

Well, in the case of broken needle funerals, I think it's totally happy.   Imagine it, hundreds of us around the world are performing (or have performed) little kuyo services for our trusty little friends.



Moreover, I'm just happy that I've stitched enough over the past year that I actually have a lot of broken needles!



Time to take all those broken needles we've acquired over the past year and show them some love and respect...

Last year I wrapped them in an old sewing pattern and wrote a love note and buried them in the yard.



This year, I decided to try the traditional Japanese tofu method...tofu is considered a soft resting place after the many hours of the needles' labor.

I'm going to wait to bury them until the rain lets up. It's pouring/sleeting here. Until then the angels are watching over them...


I've also written a little note of thanks to bury as well...thanking the needles for all the skills I've gained while using them and asking that the sorrows that they shared with me while we worked will be buried along with them.

Don't want to write your own?  Feel free to copy this beautiful poem written by friend Lane Jennings:



I'm looking forward to visiting your blogs and seeing how you're honoring this Day of the Needle!

Add your link below so we can all stop by to visit!



What is Harikuyo, you ask?  Check out these prior posts on the Japanese tradition:

Preparing for Harikuyo...trip to Japanese shrine
My Original Book of Needles
Needlebooks Multiply in 2012
Harikuyo 2012

Happy Harikuyo everyone!  Have fun visiting each other!

P.S.   I decided to make the online Harikuyo E-course available anytime.  If you missed out the first and second time around,  go here to check it out.

P.S.  Needle labels are re-stocked in my Etsy shop.  10 different woven ribbon labels for sewing into your needlebook to keep all those organized.

29 comments:

Catherine said...

I always love your yearly Harikuyo posts!! Our needles do take us on quite the journey, through good times and rough times, don't they?

The Chilly Hollow Needlepoint Adventure said...

Blog went to an imaginary Japanese garden and tossed little packets of used needles into the waters there.
http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com/2013/02/festival-of-broken-needles-2013.html

Maureen Flaherty said...

I am happy to be honoring my 2 broken needles today and as usually you did a great job honoring this day.

inlovewiththreads said...

I still have my little coffin with broken needles and pins. I made this last year after Susan had posted about the Japanese ritual. The coffin sits in pride of place on a little shelf with other knickknacks.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

I have never heard of such a ritual. I think it very appropriate for those that weild a needle often. I have always felt naughty when I have broken a needle. I won't feel so bad now that I am aware of this great respect for needles. They are the work horse of the sewing trade.

Jillayne said...

Wonderful idea Susan - thank you!
The needle is truly a wonderful thing for so many of us and scope of what can be created with such a simple tool is mind-boggling... it certainly deserves a day of honour.

Createology said...

Susan thank you...I am learning sew much. The tofu is perfect and I will use that next year. This poem is lovely. I have linked my post. Thank you for your wonderful sharing of skills and knowledge. Your e-course was excellent. Happy Hari-Kuyo dear...

verobirdie said...

Thank you Susan for this great idea.
I'm going to please my eyes with those posts :-)

Shirlee Fassell said...

Thanks Susan... It's only right to honor the needles that have brought me so much pleasure!!

Moonsilk Stitches said...

As usual, when this day rolls around, I can't find the little baggie where I've kept my broken needles and pins. When I find it, I'll pin them into a piece of felt and bury them. In the meantime, I posted a selection of my pincushions on my blog here: http://moonsilk-stitches.blogspot.com/2013/02/broken-needle-festival.html

Margaret said...

Maybe it's all my nurses' training, or my years looking after an insulin-dependent spouse but...while I love my needles and do have some favourites (especially for sewing in yarn ends and for embroidery on linen)...my bent and broken needs and pins (bless 'em) end up in a utilitarian plastic yellow sharps container from the local pharmacy!

Ati. said...

Thanks Susan for the reminder:) I use the needlebook always!

Suzanne Bruno said...

Hello Susan, Thank you for the year of stitching inspiration and special thanks for introducing me to Hari Kuyu.
Suzanne

Unknown said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Unknown said...

My needle book holds just one needle this year and it broke just after I completed the book!
Thank you for the reminder and the wonderful needle book, I use it constantly!
-Daphne

coral-seas said...

I've just written my blog on Harikuyo, now I am going to follow the links above before settling down to clean my needles. Happy Harikuyo!

sudukc said...

I just posted my Hari-Kuyo blog and linked us together too.

Cath said...

Thank you for the opportunity to share and also for the inspiration you've provided through the year :-)

Miriam said...

Thank you Susan for intoducing us to this fascinating tradition. I have been using my needlebook for almost a year and have saved my broken and worn needles. My needles have let me stitch through my sorrows and still given me hours of pleasure.
In my Hari-Kuyo blog post I have linked back here.

Ann said...

My needles will continue to live in my needlebook, their use fulfilled, but still important to remind me of all the stitches they are responsible for.

biddie1031 said...

Harikuyo was celebrated in Easton, Maryland today. I shared the story of the festival with my Friday canvaswork group, and each one contributed a retired needle to my collection of "used but not forgotten" needles. At the end of the day, I thanked each one, carefully wrapped them in pretty paper, and floated the little package out into Peachblossom Creek. It was a truly meaningful way to recognize that our needles are central to our handwork. And, so the new year begins with lots of needle projects in progress.

Thank you, Susan, for the spectacular job you've done with the Harikuyo kits and instructions. My needlebook has been my constant companion since I had the fun of making it last year. I'm also happy to report that one of my needle buddies recently received her Harikuyo kit, and I hope the other ladies won't be far behind her.

Happy Harikuyo to you -- and here's to lots of Playing with Needles!!

Best wishes,
Meg van den Berg
Easton

Margaret said...

Thanks for the wonderful needlebook. I so enjoyed making it under your instruction.

Laura Kirste Campbell said...

I've never heard of this...what a sweet concept. I love your needlebook!

Rachel said...

It's a lovely idea. Unfortunately - or fortunately! - I've not stitched as much as I would have liked this year, and nothing's broken!

Denise said...

I'm actually excited to browse around your blog to see what I can learn from you :)I'm your new follower,drop by any time to have a cup of tea/coffee with Me,We can chat.Denise of Coffeeberry Cottage

MulticoloredPieces said...

Hi, Susan. This is very appropriate for a blog named "plays with needles"! I'm not sure I could find my broken needles...they must be around someplace. I guess that's what worries my husband--he might sit on one...
Very fun post!
best, nadia

MulticoloredPieces said...

Hi, Susan. This is very appropriate for a blog named "plays with needles"! I'm not sure I could find my broken needles...they must be around someplace. I guess that's what worries my husband--he might sit on one...
Very fun post!
best, nadia

Cassandra and Alex said...

Thank you so much for bringing this tradition to light. It is fascinating and I will be taking part next year for sure!
–Cassandra

Queen Bee's Musings said...

Love your posts and thanks for your comment. I had been out of town also and then babysitting. I did keep your thought to my heart and have pulled out my needle book project to finish after I complete all my Valentines gift.
I have learned much about Harikuyo from you and the blessing of needles! Thank you!

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